The Button man
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The Button man a Hugo Marston novel by Mark Pryor

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Fiction,
  • Murder,
  • Americans,
  • Investigation,
  • Motion picture actors and actresses

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementMark Pryor
SeriesHugo Marston novel
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS3616.R976 B88 2014
The Physical Object
Pagination269 pages
Number of Pages269
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL27165798M
ISBN 101616149949
ISBN 109781616149949
LC Control Number2014012145
OCLC/WorldCa866615190

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Button Man is not the usual immigrant rags-to-riches tale. The remarkable life of Morris Rabishevsky (soon to be Raab) is actually, "with only a few embellishments," the story of the author's own grandfather. Gross's love and admiration for the man show through on every page/5(). Button Man: A Novel and millions of other books are available for instant access. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required/5().   The Button Man takes a button when he takes a victim. And he takes a victim whenever he wants. The authorities dont know he exists, though he leaves them ample evidence of his existence. They just dont see it. As a rookie patrolman, Detective Dan Finney met The Button Man in Maria Kuroshchepovas apartment/5.   THE BUTTON MAN: A HUGO MARSTON PREQUEL by Mark Pryor is #4 in this great mystery series. This title acts as a ‘prequel’ to Hugo’s current stint as security for the American Embassy in Paris. Hugo is a favorite character of mine and this title has a bit of a ‘classic British mystery’ touch/5.

  “ BUTTON MAN is a riveting piece of historical fiction, mixed with family saga, exposing the Jewish mob of the ’s who preyed on the garment industry and the brave few who stood up against them. This book is a heart-stopper. The book works on multiple levels with some serious connections to pulp detective thrillers of the 50's all the way to contemporary dark books like the Dexter series. The Button Man is unlike any serial killer before him which is exactly what makes him impossible to catch. Great plot twists and a fast paced dramatic conclusion make this a great read/5.   BUTTON MAN: Five Questions with Andrew Gross. A few years ago, well-known thriller author Andrew Gross made headlines when it was announced that he’d be switching genres after signing a book deal with Minotaur Books, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press. Months later, in the summer of , Gross debuted his first historical fiction novel, The One Man.   Button Man by Andrew Gross is a stirring story of a Jewish family brought together in the dawn of the women’s garment business and torn apart by the birth of organized crime in New York City in the s. Take a visual tour through Button Man with GIFnotes! New York Times-bestselling author Andrew Gross is no stranger to taking risks. He spent 20 years in the .

  Play Book Tag: The Button Man by Andrew Gross. stars: Amy: 2 PM Play Book Tag: Button Man, by Andrew Gross; 4 Stars: Hahtoolah: 2 PM Jewish Book Club: Early Impressions of Button Man, by Andrew Gross -- January Jan: 8 PM. The Button Man: A Hugo Marston Novel and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.4/5(78). Button Man. by Andrew Gross. Chapter One. There was a chill in the air, for April, as Morris Raab headed back down Seventh Avenue. And a chill was always good for the coat business, anyone on the street would say. While Sol was always in the books, Morris saw no point in staying in school when, at twelve, he was already set to make his way. Button Man has plenty of zip–and lots of moxie, too." –Wall Street Journal "This is a big, heartfelt handshake of a book, with all the street-scrambling energy that distinguishes the best fiction of Jeffrey Archer and Mario Puzo." –USA Today.